When people think about the words “law” or “legal,” they usually have cold connotations associated with the terms.

But the legal realm is so much more than meets the eye. Law has been built on the backbones of some of the greatest thinkers of our time. Many of them were once philosophers who questioned anything and everything.

In this effect, law and philosophy are deeply intertwined and inherently related.

In the old times, the great philosophers questioned things such as “what is law? What constitutes a just law?” and much more.

When a lawyer is defending someone in court, they do not think whether the thing their client is being prosecuted for is right, wrong, good, or bad. Instead, they factor in how they can circumvent the existing law, depending on the situation.

Conversely, lawmakers in this day and age think differently. Unfortunately, we live in a world where morality and belief are regularly confused as to what should be considered law. This is where we find many arguments and debates about some of the most personal types of bills circulating the various levels of congress and the legal system. These are the debates and arguments over things like abortion, gay rights, etc. While, at the end of the day, the law is the law, it is the actual process of becoming a law where philosophy must come into play, rather than morality and belief.

While there are many lawmakers and members of congress believing that the bills they present to the appropriate bodies are based on their philosophical and ethical beliefs, they have much more to do with their own moral and religious groundings.

It is important to separate each of these topics into their own distinct categories, and treat them each as separate things with their own meanings, histories, consequences, and schools of thought.